Twist Street

Sam Westing, Barney Northrup, Sandy McSouthers, Julian R. Eastman, & Me

Posts tagged comedy nerdery

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I have to be very careful about how I phrase this traumatic childhood memory,” Sam tells me, recalling an incident, when he was five, between his mother and a famous neighbor. “I walked in on Groucho Marx and my mother in my parents’ bedroom. They were both on the bed. They were fully clothed. I saw him jump off the bed into my sight line, and then she was sitting up.” Sam starts chuckling. “I don’t know exactly what happened. My mother might have been fighting for her honor.” He laughs again. “Though I think I may have overheard Groucho saying, ‘I can see you in the kitchen, bending over a hot stove. Now I can’t see the stove.’
From an article about The Simpsons's Sam Simon, who has terminal cancer.

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I’m really enjoying that Garfunkel & Oates show.  I’ve liked them for what feels like forever— before they were even a thing, Kate Micucci used to do little piano songs at the Tomorrow Show or the old Acid Reflux show, at least.  I just really liked the new episode, the one with Jonah & Kumail and Busy Phillips — I liked how it was about something I kinda find weird and funny, how good-looking people can be good-looking in different ways that get, like, received differently(?). Plus, the whole horror movie bit with Ike Barinholtz and Davey Johnson, Riki making fun of that one horror remake she’d been in.
Or I just think it’s really neat how there are all these buddy-comedy shows on now, between this, Broad City, and Playing House (and the Alie-Georgia shows, if “nonfiction” counts; probably should).  Besides just getting to see shows about ladies being buddies, besides just the novelty or whatever— I just think these all have been pretty interesting shows in really very different ways, comedically.  They all approach things super-different. None of the shows are even near the same to me, but they’ve all had pretty interesting first seasons in general, just how Broad City been super-weird but so specific about who its characters are that it’s really connected with its fans, or I think in how Garfunkel & Oates have approached each episode as its own thing in a kind of almost low-key Community-like way, or how Playing House has just built a Gilmore Girls-like small town universe around itself.  It’s pretty neat, all that…

I’m really enjoying that Garfunkel & Oates show.  I’ve liked them for what feels like forever— before they were even a thing, Kate Micucci used to do little piano songs at the Tomorrow Show or the old Acid Reflux show, at least.  I just really liked the new episode, the one with Jonah & Kumail and Busy Phillips — I liked how it was about something I kinda find weird and funny, how good-looking people can be good-looking in different ways that get, like, received differently(?). Plus, the whole horror movie bit with Ike Barinholtz and Davey Johnson, Riki making fun of that one horror remake she’d been in.

Or I just think it’s really neat how there are all these buddy-comedy shows on now, between this, Broad City, and Playing House (and the Alie-Georgia shows, if “nonfiction” counts; probably should).  Besides just getting to see shows about ladies being buddies, besides just the novelty or whatever— I just think these all have been pretty interesting shows in really very different ways, comedically.  They all approach things super-different. None of the shows are even near the same to me, but they’ve all had pretty interesting first seasons in general, just how Broad City been super-weird but so specific about who its characters are that it’s really connected with its fans, or I think in how Garfunkel & Oates have approached each episode as its own thing in a kind of almost low-key Community-like way, or how Playing House has just built a Gilmore Girls-like small town universe around itself.  It’s pretty neat, all that…

Filed under comedy nerdery All I Ever Write About on this blog is Television...

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What does it feel like to be you? Yeah. It feels good to be you, doesn’t it? It feels good, because there’s one thing that you are — you’re the only one that’s you, right?. So you’re the only one that’s you, and we get confused sometimes — or I do, I think everyone does — you try to compete. You think, Dammit, someone else is trying to be me. Someone else is trying to be me. But I don’t have to armor myself against those people; I don’t have to armor myself against that idea if I can really just relax and feel content in this way and this regard.

If I can just feel, just think now: How much do you weigh? This is a thing I like to do with myself when I get lost and I get feeling funny. How much do you weigh? Think about how much each person here weighs and try to feel that weight in your seat right now, in your bottom right now. Parts in your feet and parts in your bum. Just try to feel your own weight, in your own seat, in your own feet. Okay? So if you can feel that weight in your body, if you can come back into the most personal identification, a very personal identification, which is: I am. This is me now. Here I am, right now. This is me now. Then you don’t feel like you have to leave, and be over there, or look over there. You don’t feel like you have to rush off and be somewhere. There’s just a wonderful sense of well-being that begins to circulate up and down, from your top to your bottom. Up and down from your top to your spine. And you feel something that makes you almost want to smile, that makes you want to feel good, that makes you want to feel like you could embrace yourself.

So what’s it like to be me? You can ask yourself, What’s it like to be me? You know, the only way we’ll ever know what it’s like to be you is if you work your best at being you as often as you can, and keep reminding yourself: That’s where home is.

Bill Murray. (via nedhepburn)

(via nedhepburn)

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liezlwashere:

UCB-LA | Seth & Ed’s Puppet Show | 04.19.08Back in the day, Seth Morris and Ed Helms did a monthly talk show in which they would interview guests as themselves, but in puppet form.
That night, Jason Mantzoukas was interviewed, and took the form of that wolf puppet on the left. When the interview turned to dating, Manzoukas asked the ladies in the audience about having sex on the first date. As the audience clapped, he slooooowly creeped out behind the puppet stage to see who was clapping in response to his question.
I didn’t know who he was at the time, but this was the definitive moment I became a fan of him. 

liezlwashere:

UCB-LA | Seth & Ed’s Puppet Show | 04.19.08

Back in the day, Seth Morris and Ed Helms did a monthly talk show in which they would interview guests as themselves, but in puppet form.

That night, Jason Mantzoukas was interviewed, and took the form of that wolf puppet on the left. When the interview turned to dating, Manzoukas asked the ladies in the audience about having sex on the first date. As the audience clapped, he slooooowly creeped out behind the puppet stage to see who was clapping in response to his question.

I didn’t know who he was at the time, but this was the definitive moment I became a fan of him. 

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I did the occasional “Clutch Cargo” voice where they’d show the lips. Robert Smigel did about 90% of those, but they’d have me and McCann do them occasionally and Louis C.K. did some — even when he wasn’t writing at the show anymore they’d bring him in to do Mike Tyson once in a while.
From an interview with Brian Stack.  Louis CK was the voice of Mike Tyson on the old Clutch Cargo’s?  I feel like I didn’t know that.  The best Clutch Cargo character was Bill Clinton, but still… (Also: Brian Stack interviews are always like a cup of hot chocolate.  He talks about the origins of Wikibear!)

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dharbin:

COOL COOL COOL
A “Persons Of Interest” drawing. You can get your own here, as my schedule allows. Short version is I’ll draw any famous/widely recognizable figure, fictional or historical or just popular, just once.

dharbin:

COOL COOL COOL

A “Persons Of Interest” drawing. You can get your own here, as my schedule allows. Short version is I’ll draw any famous/widely recognizable figure, fictional or historical or just popular, just once.

Filed under comedy nerdery drawrings

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Popeye— he’s fucking great in it. That’s the weirdest movie of all time— why is Robert Altman directing a movie about Popeye? Who did I meet that said— they had stories about meeting Robin. He was like, we went to Malta to shoot that— Malta, an island in the middle of the Mediterranean. And he’s like, there’s no coke there— and that’s at a point in my life where I was fueled by cocaine, I had to have cocaine. And so, they couldn’t get cocaine there. So all of the sudden a bunch of Parisian models, like really sexy female Parisian models started showing up to the island of Malta. And all of the sudden, Robin Williams had coke. And it turns out that Popeye was made by vag-ed Parisian model coke. He had a bunch of sexy Parisian mules carrying the stuff. It’s a good movie.

I don’t want to live in a world where Robin Williams wasn’t getting Parisian pussy coke.
Jeff Davis, on Harmontown.

Filed under comedy nerdery