Twist Street

Sam Westing, Barney Northrup, Sandy McSouthers, Julian R. Eastman, & Me

Posts tagged Worst Hobby or Worstest Hobby?

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December Covers

Comic-nerd stuff: It was nagging at me the other day that years and years ago, I used to do this thing, where I’d look at all the comic covers the mainstream publishers were soliciting months out, and pick out the “good ones”— the couple that I thought actually stood out from the usual mess those companies put out there.  Hadn’t done it in years— kinda missed it, once I realized that’d stopped happening.  

So I’m going to spend my lunchbreak doing that under a jump, just for Marvel, DC and Image (because I haven’t seen any other solicitations from other publishers— don’t really know where to look anymore, actually…?).  Not too many covers because… there aren’t too many I’m into (a lot of bad paintings).  Sorry if jumps don’t work on phones…?  I don’t know how that works— if those don’t work on phones, let me know and I’ll … apologize…?  (I’m just really paranoid about that).  This is obviously without saying any of these books will be or are any good or not— just looking at covers qua covers…

Read more …

Filed under Worst Hobby or Worstest Hobby? drawrings

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wellnotwisely:

'The Divine, written by Israeli writer/filmmaker Boaz Lavie, and illustrated by the immensely talented Asaf and Tomer Hanuka, will be concurrently released in English with First Second, and in French by Darguad, next year. It follows the story of former military man Mike, whose humdrum civilian life is interrupted by his army friend Jason, who persuades him to take on a job which he assures him is easy money:  a covert, lucrative contract in an obscure, cicil-war ridden, South-Asian country called Quanlom. The job turns out be far from simple, however, as it turns oyut the civil war is being led by two 10-year old twins with supernatural powers. Heidi MacDonald’s got a blurb over at The Beat, which describes it as ‘a fast-paced, brutal, and breathlessly beautiful portrait of a world where ancient powers vie with modern warfare and nobody escapes unscathed.’ The Hanuka’s can draw the living hell out of anything, so I imagine a lot of people- myself included- will be all over this one.’
(via Comics&Cola)

Hanukas…

wellnotwisely:

'The Divine, written by Israeli writer/filmmaker Boaz Lavie, and illustrated by the immensely talented Asaf and Tomer Hanuka, will be concurrently released in English with First Second, and in French by Darguad, next year. It follows the story of former military man Mike, whose humdrum civilian life is interrupted by his army friend Jason, who persuades him to take on a job which he assures him is easy money:  a covert, lucrative contract in an obscure, cicil-war ridden, South-Asian country called Quanlom. The job turns out be far from simple, however, as it turns oyut the civil war is being led by two 10-year old twins with supernatural powers. Heidi MacDonald’s got a blurb over at The Beat, which describes it as ‘a fast-paced, brutal, and breathlessly beautiful portrait of a world where ancient powers vie with modern warfare and nobody escapes unscathed.’ The Hanuka’s can draw the living hell out of anything, so I imagine a lot of people- myself included- will be all over this one.’

(via Comics&Cola)

Hanukas…

Filed under Worst Hobby or Worstest Hobby?

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It didn’t always used to be this way. I used to only have sons. Things sure were different then. How merrily I used to drive down country lanes in my old Ford, periodically dodging off-road to mow down female pedestrians (you must remember I had no daughters then). Was what I did wrong? How was I to know? I had no daughters to think of.

Before I had daughters — Stimothy and Atalanta are truly the apples of my eye — I would follow women into voting booths and knock their hands away from the lever whenever they tried to engage in the democratic process. Who knew having daughters would change all that? Not I.

Personally, now that I have daughters, I don’t think anyone should do bad things to women, especially the ones who are my daughters. I think we should treat every woman in the world like she was my daughter, except for my wife and my mother, who I will treat slightly differently.
Mallory Ortberg @ The Toast.  People in comics do this *all the time* and my life has been enriched by getting to snicker about it for years and years.  ”My dick made a thing that taught me not to be a crappy person because I couldn’t figure that out before, before my dick held an intervention.”  ”Capital! Here is your Eisner Award.”  Actual life.  P.S. Stimothy!

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comicsworkbook:

Andrew White

whitecomics:

Hello! I just put the full, complete, final version of my comic Black Pillars online because I would like to make it easier for people to read it. Read issue one here and issue two here.

Thanks, and if you read the comic I hope you like it. There are a few print copies of #1 and plenty of #2 left for sale. Or you can buy PDFs via Gumroad, or buy one of my other comics. You should not feel bad if you do not do any of these things. Bye.

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constellation-funk:

comicsreporter:

Bill Watterson, the creator of ”Calvin and 

I can’t find this information anywhere else but the Comics Reporter is usually very reliable but but but it’s not anywhere on Google if you put it in but but but but but but

Tom didn’t even say that! Click on the link, and Tom’s saying something completely different until Blaise Larmee (that’s who AltComics is, right?) changed what he said…????  Tom hasn’t tweeted anything either.  EDITED TO ADD: if you look at that first image on his tumblr, it doesn’t really lend much credence to this being true either.

If this is a hoax, it’s a fucking ugly and mean-spirited one.  I wouldn’t understand why anyone would find it very funny.

Filed under Worst Hobby or Worstest Hobby?

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re: Jules Feiffer’s Kill My Mother, I didn’t agree with everything Dash Shaw had to say about it over at the Journal, but he’s definitely right to the extent of it being a book that I think would have benefited from having a better editor than whoever they got.  Just that they blow the best part of the book, by not knowing to put a massive reveal on the left side instead of the right side of the book— very frustrating choice! Easily caught— easily fixable! (I think Dash maybe overstates how confusing the layouts are though… not wrong that there are issues but I don’t think they derailed me much). But besides that, entertaining little crime yarn— some nice turns. Plus, Feiffer!  And Feiffer characters— all that yearning and groping and clumsiness and worry.  I’m not a Feiffer expert, there’s some major stuff of his I’ve never seen, so it was fun seeing a lot of things from him I’d never seen him do before. 
(That New York Times review though— they got Laura Lippman but instead of writing it from her perspective of a crime novelist, she goes on about “The plot doesn’t break new ground in the genre, but that’s almost impossible to do. The more central question is whether a noir graphic novel has something to offer that traditional novels and film do not."  Which isn’t a completely uninteresting question, but one after 80 some years of crime comics doesn’t seem especially “central”…? Points for at least considering its formal properties at least, I guess, but …).

re: Jules Feiffer’s Kill My Mother, I didn’t agree with everything Dash Shaw had to say about it over at the Journal, but he’s definitely right to the extent of it being a book that I think would have benefited from having a better editor than whoever they got.  Just that they blow the best part of the book, by not knowing to put a massive reveal on the left side instead of the right side of the book— very frustrating choice! Easily caught— easily fixable! (I think Dash maybe overstates how confusing the layouts are though… not wrong that there are issues but I don’t think they derailed me much). But besides that, entertaining little crime yarn— some nice turns. Plus, Feiffer!  And Feiffer characters— all that yearning and groping and clumsiness and worry.  I’m not a Feiffer expert, there’s some major stuff of his I’ve never seen, so it was fun seeing a lot of things from him I’d never seen him do before. 

(That New York Times review though— they got Laura Lippman but instead of writing it from her perspective of a crime novelist, she goes on about “The plot doesn’t break new ground in the genre, but that’s almost impossible to do. The more central question is whether a noir graphic novel has something to offer that traditional novels and film do not."  Which isn’t a completely uninteresting question, but one after 80 some years of crime comics doesn’t seem especially “central”…? Points for at least considering its formal properties at least, I guess, but …).

Filed under Worst Hobby or Worstest Hobby?

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Jack Kirby from 1941’s Captain America #7.  

Page thirteen  above looks like a strong Kirby action layout, with its plethora of leaping and hyper-extended figures throughout the area. The slugfests in panels five through seven are especially enjoyable. There is a strong compositional connection between Bucky’s uppercut in panel five and Cap’s shield slam in panel six, creating the circular movement that takes us around the two separate groups of figures. The tie up of feet at the border of the two panels brings the eye to the pile-up in panel seven.

Jack Kirby from 1941’s Captain America #7.  

Page thirteen  above looks like a strong Kirby action layout, with its plethora of leaping and hyper-extended figures throughout the area. The slugfests in panels five through seven are especially enjoyable. There is a strong compositional connection between Bucky’s uppercut in panel five and Cap’s shield slam in panel six, creating the circular movement that takes us around the two separate groups of figures. The tie up of feet at the border of the two panels brings the eye to the pile-up in panel seven.

Filed under Worst Hobby or Worstest Hobby?