Twist Street

Sam Westing, Barney Northrup, Sandy McSouthers, Julian R. Eastman, & Me

Posts tagged Worst Hobby or Worstest Hobby?

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Reading more about online rape threats during my lunch break, because comic books, because that’s what I do for fun anymore, and something keeps popping up that I don’t really have my head around in these articles and think pieces and what have you (which are all lovely), but this idea of various actors being anonymous and/or unidentifiable.  What is going on there?  I’m not really an expert on anything, but how anonymous is that internet exactly?  
I’ve subpoenaed twitter before— twitter tells you the e-mail address and ip address associated with the account.  (You need an e-mail address to login to a twitter account, I think…?). Which is just a breadcrumb but … But I guess that’s my question: aren’t there lots of breadcrumbs people leave around anymore?  It seems like it.  That time, I was up against some technically sophisticated people so that wasn’t so straightforward (though not without value), without saying too much about a thing I can’t talk about.  But most people…?  Most people aren’t as sophisticated as the bad actors I was dealing with, so… so yeah, how anonymous is that internet?
I don’t know.  If I were ever rape-threatened because of my opinion on an X-men comic (I only got called a “psychotic coont” once over my opinion on an X-Men comic because somebody thought I had a girl’s name, but they didn’t mention rape)(I think my name sounds macho),  I guess I can see a series of steps I would then take.  But … I guess that’s not a series of steps that “normal” people would really relish or want to spend time on or rub their hands about. Or maybe there’s some technical thing I’m missing (?)— the technical part of it is where I couldn’t guess. My answer to everything is “just sue somebody”— it’s why I could never be on Jeopardy.  I guess all problems look like nails to a guy with a hammer, or whatever that saying is.  (Did I just compare myself to a hammer?  I did!  See— muy macho!)  I don’t know.  I no-joke almost on a once a week basis experience genuine regret that I didn’t sue the high school I went to as a child, for reasons too grotesque to discuss in mixed company.  I guess I’m not in a real healthy place.

Reading more about online rape threats during my lunch break, because comic books, because that’s what I do for fun anymore, and something keeps popping up that I don’t really have my head around in these articles and think pieces and what have you (which are all lovely), but this idea of various actors being anonymous and/or unidentifiable.  What is going on there?  I’m not really an expert on anything, but how anonymous is that internet exactly?  

I’ve subpoenaed twitter before— twitter tells you the e-mail address and ip address associated with the account.  (You need an e-mail address to login to a twitter account, I think…?). Which is just a breadcrumb but … But I guess that’s my question: aren’t there lots of breadcrumbs people leave around anymore?  It seems like it.  That time, I was up against some technically sophisticated people so that wasn’t so straightforward (though not without value), without saying too much about a thing I can’t talk about.  But most people…?  Most people aren’t as sophisticated as the bad actors I was dealing with, so… so yeah, how anonymous is that internet?

I don’t know.  If I were ever rape-threatened because of my opinion on an X-men comic (I only got called a “psychotic coont” once over my opinion on an X-Men comic because somebody thought I had a girl’s name, but they didn’t mention rape)(I think my name sounds macho),  I guess I can see a series of steps I would then take.  But … I guess that’s not a series of steps that “normal” people would really relish or want to spend time on or rub their hands about. Or maybe there’s some technical thing I’m missing (?)— the technical part of it is where I couldn’t guess. My answer to everything is “just sue somebody”— it’s why I could never be on Jeopardy.  I guess all problems look like nails to a guy with a hammer, or whatever that saying is.  (Did I just compare myself to a hammer?  I did!  See— muy macho!)  I don’t know.  I no-joke almost on a once a week basis experience genuine regret that I didn’t sue the high school I went to as a child, for reasons too grotesque to discuss in mixed company.  I guess I’m not in a real healthy place.

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davepress:

The Man Behind the Comic Book That Finally Got Sex Right by Laura Hudson at WIRED.


A great article, and any time I hear a thing about Chabon working in Casanova-land I do a little twitch in my seat in excitement.

There’ve been no other comics about sex because something something superhero comics…?  Ridiculous, but people have to sell their comics, I guess— I’m not really a marketing person so I don’t really know how that works.  But at what point do we get to talk about comics without pretending (a) that anyone making a nice comic is Dorflar the Three-Eyed Wonder-Mutant and (b) defining all other comics as just the shitty ones??  Why is that the weird mythology of comics that people are so insistent upon?  Is it because, like, people got raised on Batman… he can’t just be writing a nice comic— he has to be Batman?  Sex Batman? (It’d be less weird if your Sex Batman had a little more hesitation about writing Maria Hill rape-comics but… pobody’s nerfect, I guess).
There have been lots of comics about sex (even if you don’t count manga)(I don’t know why you’re not allowed, but).  Some of them have been better than Sex Criminals.  More of them have been arguably much worse— I’d definitely rather read Sex Criminals than all the Broken Guy sex-comics.  But “There’s never been this sort of comic book"—?? I don’t know.  I’m just not a marketing guy.  I still like comics because I think they have a history, though, so that "it needs saving" myth doesn’t find purchase with me like it probably does with most people. I am looking forward to Chabon, too, though!
(Also, entirely separately but since I’m taking a while getting my morning going: this whole saying I keep hearing in connection to the “there are too many rape threats in comics" conversation— which is a delightful subject— there’s this weird thing people keep saying over, "We ALL have to do better."  Where did that come from?  It’s a nice sentiment— I don’t want to crap on the sentiment.  I think it’s great that rape threats got their own Smokey D. Bear motto, but it’s just more interesting to me how these little lines dig into people’s skulls and go viral like that.  I’m probably the only one who finds that interesting because everyone else is probably, like, paying attention to the rape threats, whereas I’m obviously not a very good person.  Sayings are interesting though!). 

davepress:

The Man Behind the Comic Book That Finally Got Sex Right by Laura Hudson at WIRED.

A great article, and any time I hear a thing about Chabon working in Casanova-land I do a little twitch in my seat in excitement.

There’ve been no other comics about sex because something something superhero comics…?  Ridiculous, but people have to sell their comics, I guess— I’m not really a marketing person so I don’t really know how that works.  But at what point do we get to talk about comics without pretending (a) that anyone making a nice comic is Dorflar the Three-Eyed Wonder-Mutant and (b) defining all other comics as just the shitty ones??  Why is that the weird mythology of comics that people are so insistent upon?  Is it because, like, people got raised on Batman… he can’t just be writing a nice comic— he has to be Batman?  Sex Batman? (It’d be less weird if your Sex Batman had a little more hesitation about writing Maria Hill rape-comics but… pobody’s nerfect, I guess).

There have been lots of comics about sex (even if you don’t count manga)(I don’t know why you’re not allowed, but).  Some of them have been better than Sex Criminals.  More of them have been arguably much worse— I’d definitely rather read Sex Criminals than all the Broken Guy sex-comics.  But “There’s never been this sort of comic book"—?? I don’t know.  I’m just not a marketing guy.  I still like comics because I think they have a history, though, so that "it needs saving" myth doesn’t find purchase with me like it probably does with most people. I am looking forward to Chabon, too, though!

(Also, entirely separately but since I’m taking a while getting my morning going: this whole saying I keep hearing in connection to the “there are too many rape threats in comics" conversation— which is a delightful subject— there’s this weird thing people keep saying over, "We ALL have to do better."  Where did that come from?  It’s a nice sentiment— I don’t want to crap on the sentiment.  I think it’s great that rape threats got their own Smokey D. Bear motto, but it’s just more interesting to me how these little lines dig into people’s skulls and go viral like that.  I’m probably the only one who finds that interesting because everyone else is probably, like, paying attention to the rape threats, whereas I’m obviously not a very good person.  Sayings are interesting though!). 

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angryampersand:

angryampersand:

I’m really glad people are opening up and talking now, because the degree to which people think shit like this is acceptable is ridiculous. Industry professionals need to make huge changes, but so do consumers and fans. We just all need to be better than this. Jesus Christ. 


Adding these last tweets too because it illustrates perfectly how this stuff goes even beyond “internet harassment” to creating a culture where women don’t feel safe doing their day to day lives because of  the way that men get away with this shit ( and without being challenged or silenced!). 
My biggest hope from all these conversations is that they will not just go away, like so many previous ones, and that things will start to change, because. I mean how many other ways are there to say this? Unacceptable and abhorrent in every way. 

angryampersand:

angryampersand:

I’m really glad people are opening up and talking now, because the degree to which people think shit like this is acceptable is ridiculous. Industry professionals need to make huge changes, but so do consumers and fans. We just all need to be better than this. Jesus Christ. 

Adding these last tweets too because it illustrates perfectly how this stuff goes even beyond “internet harassment” to creating a culture where women don’t feel safe doing their day to day lives because of  the way that men get away with this shit ( and without being challenged or silenced!). 

My biggest hope from all these conversations is that they will not just go away, like so many previous ones, and that things will start to change, because. I mean how many other ways are there to say this? Unacceptable and abhorrent in every way. 

(via annescherbina)

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Eisner Picks?  I haven’t read a lot of these books— I wouldn’t read a lot of these books— but let’s just make picks anyways, for fun times and giggles. Do I even read comics anymore?  I don’t know.  Here are my Eisner picks anyways.

  • Best Short Story: Mars to Stay.  Best Single Issue: Love & Rockets.
  • Best Continuing Series: Sex Criminals.  (I like Saga on a pure “entertainment” level but that guy doesn’t need awards, too; Sex Criminals, while I’m usually a jerk about, as a comedy nerd— it’s not really my sense of humor— it’s nice that it’s connected with people and when the book does hit its marks, it’s a pretty interesting comic. Way, way, way higher degree of difficulty, too.  More interesting art, also).
  • Best Limited Series: 47 Ronin. Best New Series: High Crimes.
  • Early Readers: Big Wet Balloon.  Kids: Hilda. Teens: March.
  • Humor: You’re All Just Jealous of My Jetpack.  (Weak category).
  • Anthology: Nobrow.  Digital: As the Crow Flies. (Odd set of picks).
  • Reality-Based: Hip Hop Family Tree.  Worst Named Category: “Reality-Based.”
  • Graphic Album (New): The Property. Adaptation: Don Quixote. Reprint: Julio’s Day. Archival: Percy Crosby. Archival: Best of EC.
  • US Edition of Foreign Material: Incidents in the Night.  (Tough category). US Edition Foreign- Asia (this is a category??): Mysterious Underground Men. (But Sunny over everything).
  • Best Writer: Kelly Sue.  (On that list?  I’d rather read Pretty Deadly than any of those other books, warts and all.  Seems like an easy pick. Though, I do like Saga— I know a lot of people think that’s just a TV show comic, with the cutesy dialogue and all; cause it kinda totally is exactly that, but heck, I like it anyways. On the other hand, that Captain Marvel book seems to have found people, in a way he hasn’t (though he does have that digital thing), so… yeah… Plus, if anyone does not need an Eisner award in their garage, it’s probably Vaughan).
  • Writer/Artist:  Jaime Hernandez. Penciller/Inker: Nate Powell.  Painter: Andrew Robinson. Cover artist: uhhhh, Chris Samnee. (Not a lot of covers that did much for me last year, I guess, if those are the nominees).  Colors: Hollingsworth, forever.  Letters: Ed Piskor.  
  • Comics-Related Periodical: … I hope that tcj.com soundly defeats the Comics Journal…?  (Those count separately???)  I guess I’m biased on that one; congratulations to all those people— good list, I guess.  Comics-Related Book: Genius Illustrated.  Scholarly Work: Superhero Reader.  Publication Design: Genius Illustrated.

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Anonymous asked: Hey, Brian. I'm an aspiring writer, and I have this complex about being a person of color trying to break into comics. I know I'm probably making a bigger deal out of this than I should, but it's kind of disheartening to see gatherings of creators and to notice the lack of color. Am I worrying for nothing? I tend to over analyze things, so this has been bugging me more than it probably should. I apologize in advance if this question is stupid, annoying, or has been asked before.

royalboiler:

iamdavidbrothers:

brianmichaelbendis:

I am not a person of color but I am the father of a multiracial household and I’m Hypery aware of the world we live in in this regard. but I truly believe that there is nothing standing in your way of making your dreams as a creative person come true. It’s between you and your talent.

truthfully most of us don’t even know what each other looks like. all anybody cares about is the quality of each other’s work.

 do not put things in front of you to stop yourself from making your dreams come true. do not. people do this all the time and I truly believe it’s the difference between those who succeed and those who fail.

stop rejecting yourself before the rejection comes. and if rejection comes, and it will, don’t make it about anything but your work.

image

Bendis has a good point here, with the idea that you shouldn’t put things in front of you and that you need to hone your craft and focus on you.

But for really real, speaking as a black man who has worked in and around comics for a while now: race matters. You’ll have to live with people treating you like their ____ friend. You’ll have to deal with people pulling you aside to show their bonafides or dropping your name as some type of proof they or someone else isn’t racist. You’ll have to deal with rarely being able to call a spade a spade without being painted as angry or sensitive. You’ll have to deal with all the usual stuff you have to deal with as a person of color, but comics is a relatively small world even now, so pushing back a little—”You need to stop talking to me about this”—makes people feel some type of way about you.

I’m real careful who I associate with in comics for these reasons. I don’t like barcon because I know somebody’s gonna say something stupid. I’ve been going to several cons a year since 2007, and I’m not exaggerating when I say I’m batting a thousand when it comes to people saying idiotic or messed up or banal racial stuff to me because I’m The Black Guy. My friends got the same story. I know women that comics boys have said garbage things to, I know professionals who have repeatedly called other folks out of their name and shrugged and smiled about it.

Comics is not a special oasis of no barriers and complete freedom. Comics is American society, and chances are good that you already know how it works.

For me, the trick ended up gathering a comics family that is wild diverse. I didn’t do it intentionally, I’m not trying to catch Pokémon out here, but real recognizes real, and I’ve gravitated to people who aren’t just the current guard in comics. My wolf pack is crucial to keeping me interested in and happy with comics.

None of this is your fault, none of this anything you should have to deal with. But as a person of color, you’re already dealing with it. You’re not overthinking it. You’re not pre-rejecting. You’re protecting yourself. You recognized a problem and you’re looking for ways to deal it. You’re on the right track, and you can beat it. You’ll find a way to beat it. You’ll find your family, and together you’ll steamroll through the nonsense.

and no shots, but it’s never just about the work if you’re anything but a white guy. That’s not how life works. Some people can’t network like white dudes in comics if they’re seen as Other, or an Anomaly, and networking is a big part of how you get gigs.

This David stuff on here. 

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