Twist Street

Sam Westing, Barney Northrup, Sandy McSouthers, Julian R. Eastman, & Me

Posts tagged Worst Hobby or Worstest Hobby?

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fuckyeah-starlord asked: Oh, you mean the Falcon having consensual sex with another adult over some wine? Do you not approve of interracial heterosexual couples?

hippie-monkey:

First off go to hell. Second it was not consensual, Sam was black out drunk, third, she was his best friends adopted daughter. Consensus is, fuck you, and fuck Rick Remender.

Reblogging this just because I like “Consensus is, fuck you” a lot.  I want to hear that phrase more in my life.  Do people that say a lot, the young people?  I’m into that— “Consensus is, fuck you” should be all of our summer jams 2014.  I’m about that life…?  (Did I use that expression right?  Pretty excited to give that expression a shot.  I like “I’m about that life” too, but I feel like it sounds wrong coming from me).  Consensus is, fuck you… haha… yeah…Let’s do that more…

I’m just sitting here reading up more on the Remender-statutory-rape contretemps over my lunch break and came across this.  Trying to get my head around why people were upset (which people don’t really want to understand much as I guess it gets in the way of their whole “hysterical women on the internet loves to get angry for no reason and it’s up to the brave men who work in comics to calm them down" narrative.  All I know is if the Usual Suspects are all high-fiving how they’ve got something nailed, something usually smells in Philadelphia.  "Your echo chamber is wrong, according to my echo chamber"— real No Win territory).

Anyways: the logic is, uh, a little more interesting than it’s been given credit for— not how my mind works necessarily as a basically shitty gentleman, but if I understand the complaint, it’s not that they’re ignoring a panel where the girl says she’s 23.  Instead, they’re arguing that panel was thrown in last-minute-ish in order to make a queasy scene “okay”— as a balm to make a scene of a guy having sex with an underage girl more palatable than it would be otherwise.  Like, “that character who was underage this whole time who you our Gross Reader got to fantasize about— well, now she’s Fair Play!"  I kind of get the logic.  And I guess there’s an objection that either way, you’re still watching a guy have sex with a girl who was raised by his best friend since she was a little kid (?) which… I guess is frowned upon (though also the premise of all the best parts of that movie Blame it on Rio— that was on HBO a lot when I was a kid; fond memories).  The Comics Reporter’s reaction seems closer to where I’m probably going to end up (“the argument would be the equivalent of saying that all of those television soap opera kid characters that go away to school for a couple of years and come back 19 years old and gorgeous are being raped, too”), but it’s interesting to at least understand.  Maybe there’s more to it that I haven’t picked up on yet though— it seems like there’s a lot of “This made me feel unwelcome" and stuff about Remender’s overall history wrapped into this that makes it all harder to understand, just being pretty divorced from that world.   I don’t know.  I just always get uneasy seeing people lecture fans, on account of my whole no-respect-for-anyone platform…

But more importantly— I just really genuinely like “consensus is, fuck you.”  I just want to celebrate that.  I really do. A phrase like that and if you google search it?  Only 21 results.  On the whole internet, 21 results.  That is a crime greater than any Rick Remender can ever imagine…

Filed under Worst Hobby or Worstest Hobby? I want to remember this for later.

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I just spent 5 minutes getting to the very bottom of the “did Captain-America-superfans mistake a scene of Falcon from the Captain America comics having wine-drunk sex with a supervillain’s daughter with full-on statutory rape because she was raised in an alternate-time-thingy where time moved faster than on normal Earth time and it was confusing how she could be 23 since she started the run as a pre-pubescent girl" controversy. I understand all of the angles. I’m hip to all the details. I’m like Keanu Reeves at the end of the Matrix. 3. I’m like Keanu Reeves at the end of the Matrix 3— I’m matrix-revolving in my office chair and yelling "take that, computers" (which is how I remember that movie ending). This is what mystics would refer to as Enlightenment. I’m reminded of a zen koan:

THE STUDENT Tokusan used to come to the master Ryutan in the evenings to talk and to listen. One night it was very late before he was finished asking questions.

"Why don’t you go to bed?" asked Ryutan.

Tokusan bowed, and lifted the screen to go out. “The hall is very dark,” he said.

"Here, take this candle," said Ryutan, lighting one for the student.

Tokusan reached out his hand, and took the candle.

Ryutan leaned forward, and blew it out.

Here— are we the student or the mentor? No. We are the candle! Enlightenment! Weeeeee….

Filed under Worst Hobby or Worstest Hobby?

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A cover of a 1966 issue of Giff Wiff, a journal published by Le Club Des Bandes Dessinées, the “first organized association of French devotees to the comic strip as art form”, founded in 1962 by, among others, Alain Resnais (presumably after he had directed Last Year at Marienbad…?).  Chris Marker (La Jette) and Alain Robbe-Grillet were also members.  Giff Wiff published, among other things, Umberto Eco's essay “Le Mythe de Superman et la dissolution du temps’ [The Myth of Superman and the Dissolution of Time”.  

A cover of a 1966 issue of Giff Wiff, a journal published by Le Club Des Bandes Dessinées, the “first organized association of French devotees to the comic strip as art form”, founded in 1962 by, among others, Alain Resnais (presumably after he had directed Last Year at Marienbad…?).  Chris Marker (La Jette) and Alain Robbe-Grillet were also members.  Giff Wiff published, among other things, Umberto Eco's essay “Le Mythe de Superman et la dissolution du temps’ [The Myth of Superman and the Dissolution of Time”.  

Filed under Worst Hobby or Worstest Hobby? Time Machine Go.

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“Joe, where do I start with Jademan?!” It’s a question I’ve encountered innumerable times, often by the water cooler or while shopping, or in the act of making love. But because I am incapable of effective communication, except in cases where my words are appended to a a comic book shopping list, I’ve had no answer until today. Here, finally, is a brief guide to potential touring points in this nation of comics.
Joe McCulloch on Jademan, check it out. (via supervillain)

Filed under Worst Hobby or Worstest Hobby?

26 notes

Did a crawl through some back issues over at the Savage Critics, where I do that kind of thing, if that’s of any interest to anybody— I should probably mention that kind of thing, I guess.  Here’s a couple pages from Paul Pope’s very cool Buzz Buzz Comics Magazine which I didn’t get around to talking about because it didn’t really fit with the rest.

Did a crawl through some back issues over at the Savage Critics, where I do that kind of thing, if that’s of any interest to anybody— I should probably mention that kind of thing, I guess.  Here’s a couple pages from Paul Pope’s very cool Buzz Buzz Comics Magazine which I didn’t get around to talking about because it didn’t really fit with the rest.

Filed under Nerd Business. Worst Hobby or Worstest Hobby?

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Anonymous asked: Ales Kot is a 16 year old Grant Morrison with no imagination who read a lot of Grant Morrison growing up

Dear Zodiac Killer:  O-okay…?  Thank you for letting me know (?), but I don’t understand exactly what that means— he’s a 16 year old who grew up reading his own future work…? Then as he gets older he, what, reprints his future work, so that he can then send it back in time to himself in order to maintain the integrity of time-space…? Is he essentially trapped in some of kind of Looper sequel…?  Terrifying.  One Looper was enough. 

If you’re trying to vent that you think he’s “derivative” of Morrison… okay.  Keep in mind, though: at Marvel alone, Gillen, Fraction, Hickman, Remender— I think all those guys have gotten that laid at their feet, and I don’t think it’s hurt their careers, especially…?  I think there’s a danger to underestimating how influential Morrison is, that… Like, the influence of Jack Kirby, right?  Kirby makes complicated things seem very simple to younger people— he’s a sort of gateway to a whole visual approach. With Morrison, I think was a pretty key guy for a lot of writers about my age, in that … You know, the intertwining of the product and the process, with Morrison, was apparently very intoxicating for folks about my age, people figuring out their process and seeing a guy like that wear his process on his sleeve so much. Example: his way of using genre comics to enter into a conversation with his influences, and make that conversation central to the appeal of the comic?   That has turned out to be something that younger writers sure seem interested in recreating, at least.  Or his particular approach in strip-mining continuity certainly has become a model approach for a LOT of guys.  Or if you look at the “hot” Image books, a lot of guys in comics sure got way more than I did out of Kill Your Boyfriend… Why him and not Moore or Gaiman?  I don’t know. Beyond scope of tumblr answer.

So, if you want to complain about Ales, go ahead, go for it.  Uh, I don’t really share in that sort of animosity, myself, though I don’t really look at his or most anybody else’s Marvel stuff so there’s a significant chunk of his career I’m unaware of because I’m out of that marketplace; I think I just pick up Zero which has good issues and bad issues like anything else… So I’m maybe not guy to be directing these things to anonymously (?).  But I’m aware he’s “polarizing” for other folks, so good luck with that. Best of luck.  I’m sincerely and widely all for people getting all rude and nasty and all of us just brutalizing one another without any regard for one another’s feelings, like proper bad guys.  If you were put on this Earth to fuck some shit up, then god bless.  But I should probably say— if you’re going to kick at somebody, kick them in the fucking balls.  You think anybody cares if you say they’re influenced by Grant Morrison?  Nobody’s going to care about that!  ”Oh no my comics remind you of one of mainstream comics’ most celebrated writers!  Oh how will I ever live with myself?!"  That’s got no teeth.  Try to guess where people’s soft spots are and then hit them there, as hard as you fucking can. Keep people on their toes— otherwise we’re all just mutely watching white guys sleepwalk through their lives, which just doesn’t sound like any kind of fun.  As I believe a great philosopher named Chiun said in the Oscar-winning documentary Remo Williams: the Adventure Begins, assassination is the highest form of public service.

Filed under Worst Hobby or Worstest Hobby?

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constellation-funk:

You make a number of good points that I hadn’t really considered when I reposted that quote. I think part of my immediate sympathy with the sentiment of the essay has to do with being a young comics person myself; I used to have pretty specific ambitions to follow that “work your way up through indies then land a job at Marvel and/or DC” from when I was 16 to when I was about 21. That all ended when a combination of the Kirby Royalties/Before Watchmen Fiasco of 2012 and an editor I was working with anonymously trolling me on Tumblr colluded to more or less put the kibosh on my enthusiasm for corporate comics at least for the time being (true that the fellow was working for an indie publisher, but he was one of those guys who had been trying to “break in” for about 20 years, hence my discomfort and suspicion of so-called professionalism that older comics workers pin to their shirts like Boy Scout medals). Even recently I’ve had publisher friends tell me that it’s wisest to keep criticism to one’s self  and I have certainly been less vitriolic these last few years, lots of which is probably due to not being a teenager anymore but a lot of it I’m sure owing to not wanting to piss off a hypothetical “wrong person.” It’s a strange fear and I think it is owed entirely to the “if you don’t have anything nice to say” etc. etc. culture that goes along not only with mainstream comics but Comix as well, where egos might be narrower but of no lesser depth.

I don’t actually think the rest of the essay is a completely necessary read; I put that quote up because I think that’s a sentiment that lots of young creators have, that we’re a little bit sick and tired of working in a culture that doesn’t really allow shots to be taken, even if those shots are directed towards something is stupid or ugly or otherwise pernicious within the culture that we work in too. I think the quote from that “veteran creator” feels a lot like it’s coming from one of those old soul artists who got no royalties from his records and has to tour every year to pay his mortgagee 40 years after his peak crapping on rap music for being made from samples: one gets the impression that he feels the younger artist has subverted “the rules” and not put in his hours and is attacking out of jealousy than out of actual artistic concern for his chosen field.

You’re totally right in that it’s unfair to just assume that from an anecdote that doesn’t source the speaker, but it’s not hard to imagine that that’s the spirit with which that sentence was spoken, and I think that it’s not the creators but the industry’s keep-quiet-and-catch-the-ball way of relating to its workers that causes that divide between younger and older creators. Being a 23 year old with one current work of note I am not pretending to be a credible authority on creator relations, I am just speaking of the situation as I have observed it. 

Filed under Worst Hobby or Worstest Hobby?

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“In fact, Loser City co-founder Danny Djeljosevic even shared an anecdote on this subject: “At ECCC the topic of Ales Kot came up, because he’s a point of contention for a lot of people in the biz, for being interesting and getting for-hire work almost immediately. I said that the dude comes off as how I imagined Grant Morrison would come off when I was 16, and a veteran creator at the table just goes ‘You’re part of the problem! Change is the worst piece of shit I’ve ever read!’” Without naming names, I’ve heard (or directly experienced) some variation on that anecdote from any number of industry people. Sometimes it’s Ales, sometimes it’s Ulises, sometimes it’s someone else. The unifying factor seems to be a jealousy that these newer creators are not just mouthing off, they’re getting work, and not just regular work, big work. The creator Danny dealt with isn’t exactly hurting for jobs, but nothing he’s working on is as high profile as any of Ales Kot’s recent work. To me, it seems like this is an issue rooted in part in jealousy and a bitterness that after years of playing nice and keeping their mouths shut, these veteran creators are watching a bunch of kids publicly challenge their bosses and peers and get rewarded for it (though it’s extremely important to point out that for the most part, it’s still unfortunately mostly only male creators who feel comfortable enough to do this). It kind of makes you wonder if the reason why comics has struggled to treat its creators better is partially because until recently, creators weren’t willing to test the limits of the unwritten laws governing the way creators behave in public.”

Why Comics Needs More Shittalkers

Wait, wait, parse this for me (and I say this without any animosity to Ales or Morgan, which fingers-crossed is obvious— i have only words for their mothers, in a pleasant Vanilla Ice kind of way) and I warmly agree with the concluding sentiment that shit-talk is good and healthy and necessary for a forward-moving comics… but the article is called “why comics needs more shittalkers" but then a) attacks a veteran creator for just being jealous (i.e. the exact kind of bullshit character assassination anyone who expresses an opinion learns to ignore and/or for most of us, I think, learn to enjoy — "you’re just saying that because blah blah blah ps I’m an idiot) and b) we never learn who this veteran creator is, which deprives us of any ability to make our own inferences about context, all so that c) instead these guys can go on and on about the same 4-5 guys who happen to be Hip Creators of the Moment while Rest of Comics is the big bad wolf lurking in the woods ( which I say again without animosity to those 4-5 guys all of whom worked their asses off getting their time, but anyone with some age to them has seen this "these creators are great because the rest of comics is ugh" cycle time in time out; my first time on that merry go round was with *Valiant*; if your sound got invented by Wizard Magazine, perhaps time to get back in the lab).

I’m in rough spirits today, maybe being ornery for no reason, my apologies, but I think I find cause to disagree with that title…? How can you want more shittalking and then attack the guy talking shit! i think if you were pro-shittalking, you’d read that story about the “veteran” (ps overused word in comics) in a spirit closer to my own reaction: rubbing your hands together, hissing “yessss yessssd more fuel for the dark princes who nourish me feeeeed us your filth, human.” Maybe I’m just ornery but it seems as though a better title might be “I like it when these guys I already like talk shit because then I believe I’m in some Exclusive Club of the Right, instead of just a regular old comic fan which I’ve allowed myself to have been trained is the very worst thing to ever be." Or alternately, "Kiko Boyd: The Erotic Love Pillow from Oklahoma”. That’d just be a great title for anything. Well, sure, a love pillow from Oklahoma probably don’t take no shit, only cum, so I’m not sure how that fits in a discussion of shit talking, I haven’t ran the math on that one by my numbers guys, but… The heart wants what the heart wants…
PS the citation to Howard Chaykin here, plus that other quote of his going around— it’d all be more persuasive if he’d made a good comic since, I don’t know, halfway through his widely adored and critically acclaimed *Hawkgirl* run that changed funnybooks foureverz…? I love his early work too but man, I also like the Music video for Herbie Hancock’s Rockit a lot too but it doesn’t come up a lot because the 1980s were a long time ago…? ”Maybe it’s time to move forward” always = the ultimate in comics shit talk though, maybe. I don’t know. Maybe I’m way off, just being ornery, being a real cuss, need an erotic love pillow for my soul (which was the name of my favorite Eels song! Score!)

(Source: constellation-funk)

Filed under Worst Hobby or Worstest Hobby?

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All-Time Favorite Stuff Week: The Marauders, created by Chris Claremont and John Romita Jr. (but see also, any appearances drawn by Marc Silvestri), and it seems from their Wikipedia page, only ever done well by those guys— after Claremont’s historic run gets ended by Jim Lee and Bob Harras, sounds like things go sideways for those characters fast and never recovers.  I just loved these dudes when I was some dumb-ass kid reading X-Men comics— these were my favorite guys in that book, more than Wolverine or anybody like that.  I always just wanted to read about these dudes. I came on to those books just around the time they were introduced in a pretty big way.  Namely, there were these sewer-dwelling loser people called the Morlocks who basically just sucked, for years in those comics, until finally someone said, “These characters suck— let’s have bad guys commit a massacre of them.”  Whoever said that was a pretty smart smartie because that was pretty sweet. (Walt Simonson then added something about “skeins" that I don’t understand but sounds pretty neat).  Deathsquads Committing Massacres for 12 Year Old Boys— worst Brian Wilson album title ever.  But what’s great about them is the Marauders are badasses only and exclusively in the context of marauding, and no other context:
The guy on the left just spun around super-fast but wouldn’t get dizzy— that is like a 5 year old’s idea of a good power to have.  I think his name was WHEEE!  
Next to him, Sabretooth who could win any fight except one against body hair.  I bet that guy’s dick is surrounded by that haircut Tina Turner had in Mad Max 2— his pubes go way beyond his thunderdome, if you will.  
The silver lady is Arclight— she  and the other Marauders were really into naked shoulders, I guess…?  Shoulders are pretty sexy. 
The green-haired girl is Havok’s wife Polaris except possessed by the evil spirit of Malice— basically a cuckold fetishest’s idea of a superhero/supervillain.  I can’t say with certainty, but I’m guessing she said “body and soul” a lot because that was a thing that X-men characters said a lot back then, when they got possessed, which was basically every single issue.
Blockbuster— here’s a description of Blockbuster appearances from the X-Men wikipedia page: during the massacre, i.e. the character’s debut, Thor kills him then burns his body; he’s “slain” (sweet word, bro) again by Havok during inferno; and then later on, his “body is seen later being eaten by Predator X”.  Not getting a lot of respect for busting all those blocks.
The next guy’s my favorite because his name is Scalphunter— I always thought that was the greatest name, especially if you’re just some New Wave guy with a mullet and dainty boots.  ”My name isn’t Captain Neonpants anymore— call me Scalphunter!"  "Oh that’s better.  Body and soul."  
The last naked-shoulder-guy is Harpoon— he could just throw Harpoons into people.  That was his power.  Not a lot of applications in a non-massacre context for that?  Not a lot of Whale Superheros in comics to stop him, though.  (Nobody cries for more whale diversity in comics :( even after all my years of cosplay and the money I spent on fried chicken).
They all worked for a guy named Mister Sinister (not pictured) who was just this kind of evil glam Ivan Lendl asshole.  I liked him because not a lot of supervillains insist you call them “mister [last name]”— most aren’t so formal.  ”Look, I don’t think we’re on a first name basis, yet, Batman"— doesn’t get said a lot by Riddler or whoever.

All-Time Favorite Stuff Week: The Marauders, created by Chris Claremont and John Romita Jr. (but see also, any appearances drawn by Marc Silvestri), and it seems from their Wikipedia page, only ever done well by those guys— after Claremont’s historic run gets ended by Jim Lee and Bob Harras, sounds like things go sideways for those characters fast and never recovers.  I just loved these dudes when I was some dumb-ass kid reading X-Men comics— these were my favorite guys in that book, more than Wolverine or anybody like that.  I always just wanted to read about these dudes. I came on to those books just around the time they were introduced in a pretty big way.  Namely, there were these sewer-dwelling loser people called the Morlocks who basically just sucked, for years in those comics, until finally someone said, “These characters suck— let’s have bad guys commit a massacre of them.”  Whoever said that was a pretty smart smartie because that was pretty sweet. (Walt Simonson then added something about “skeins" that I don’t understand but sounds pretty neat).  Deathsquads Committing Massacres for 12 Year Old Boys— worst Brian Wilson album title ever.  But what’s great about them is the Marauders are badasses only and exclusively in the context of marauding, and no other context:

  • The guy on the left just spun around super-fast but wouldn’t get dizzy— that is like a 5 year old’s idea of a good power to have.  I think his name was WHEEE!  
  • Next to him, Sabretooth who could win any fight except one against body hair.  I bet that guy’s dick is surrounded by that haircut Tina Turner had in Mad Max 2— his pubes go way beyond his thunderdome, if you will.  
  • The silver lady is Arclight— she  and the other Marauders were really into naked shoulders, I guess…?  Shoulders are pretty sexy.
  • The green-haired girl is Havok’s wife Polaris except possessed by the evil spirit of Malice— basically a cuckold fetishest’s idea of a superhero/supervillain.  I can’t say with certainty, but I’m guessing she said “body and soul” a lot because that was a thing that X-men characters said a lot back then, when they got possessed, which was basically every single issue.
  • Blockbuster— here’s a description of Blockbuster appearances from the X-Men wikipedia page: during the massacre, i.e. the character’s debut, Thor kills him then burns his body; he’s “slain” (sweet word, bro) again by Havok during inferno; and then later on, his “body is seen later being eaten by Predator X”.  Not getting a lot of respect for busting all those blocks.
  • The next guy’s my favorite because his name is Scalphunter— I always thought that was the greatest name, especially if you’re just some New Wave guy with a mullet and dainty boots.  ”My name isn’t Captain Neonpants anymore— call me Scalphunter!"  "Oh that’s better.  Body and soul."  
  • The last naked-shoulder-guy is Harpoon— he could just throw Harpoons into people.  That was his power.  Not a lot of applications in a non-massacre context for that?  Not a lot of Whale Superheros in comics to stop him, though.  (Nobody cries for more whale diversity in comics :( even after all my years of cosplay and the money I spent on fried chicken).
  • They all worked for a guy named Mister Sinister (not pictured) who was just this kind of evil glam Ivan Lendl asshole.  I liked him because not a lot of supervillains insist you call them “mister [last name]”— most aren’t so formal.  ”Look, I don’t think we’re on a first name basis, yet, Batman"— doesn’t get said a lot by Riddler or whoever.

Filed under all time favorite stuff Worst Hobby or Worstest Hobby?