Twist Street

Sam Westing, Barney Northrup, Sandy McSouthers, Julian R. Eastman, & Me

Posts tagged Worst Hobby or Worstest Hobby?

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constellation-funk:

comicsreporter:

Bill Watterson, the creator of ”Calvin and 

I can’t find this information anywhere else but the Comics Reporter is usually very reliable but but but it’s not anywhere on Google if you put it in but but but but but but

Tom didn’t even say that! Click on the link, and Tom’s saying something completely different until Blaise Larmee (that’s who AltComics is, right?) changed what he said…????  Tom hasn’t tweeted anything either.  EDITED TO ADD: if you look at that first image on his tumblr, it doesn’t really lend much credence to this being true either.

If this is a hoax, it’s a fucking ugly and mean-spirited one.  I wouldn’t understand why anyone would find it very funny.

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re: Jules Feiffer’s Kill My Mother, I didn’t agree with everything Dash Shaw had to say about it over at the Journal, but he’s definitely right to the extent of it being a book that I think would have benefited from having a better editor than whoever they got.  Just that they blow the best part of the book, by not knowing to put a massive reveal on the left side instead of the right side of the book— very frustrating choice! Easily caught— easily fixable! (I think Dash maybe overstates how confusing the layouts are though… not wrong that there are issues but I don’t think they derailed me much). But besides that, entertaining little crime yarn— some nice turns. Plus, Feiffer!  And Feiffer characters— all that yearning and groping and clumsiness and worry.  I’m not a Feiffer expert, there’s some major stuff of his I’ve never seen, so it was fun seeing a lot of things from him I’d never seen him do before. 
(That New York Times review though— they got Laura Lippman but instead of writing it from her perspective of a crime novelist, she goes on about “The plot doesn’t break new ground in the genre, but that’s almost impossible to do. The more central question is whether a noir graphic novel has something to offer that traditional novels and film do not."  Which isn’t a completely uninteresting question, but one after 80 some years of crime comics doesn’t seem especially “central”…? Points for at least considering its formal properties at least, I guess, but …).

re: Jules Feiffer’s Kill My Mother, I didn’t agree with everything Dash Shaw had to say about it over at the Journal, but he’s definitely right to the extent of it being a book that I think would have benefited from having a better editor than whoever they got.  Just that they blow the best part of the book, by not knowing to put a massive reveal on the left side instead of the right side of the book— very frustrating choice! Easily caught— easily fixable! (I think Dash maybe overstates how confusing the layouts are though… not wrong that there are issues but I don’t think they derailed me much). But besides that, entertaining little crime yarn— some nice turns. Plus, Feiffer!  And Feiffer characters— all that yearning and groping and clumsiness and worry.  I’m not a Feiffer expert, there’s some major stuff of his I’ve never seen, so it was fun seeing a lot of things from him I’d never seen him do before. 

(That New York Times review though— they got Laura Lippman but instead of writing it from her perspective of a crime novelist, she goes on about “The plot doesn’t break new ground in the genre, but that’s almost impossible to do. The more central question is whether a noir graphic novel has something to offer that traditional novels and film do not."  Which isn’t a completely uninteresting question, but one after 80 some years of crime comics doesn’t seem especially “central”…? Points for at least considering its formal properties at least, I guess, but …).

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Jack Kirby from 1941’s Captain America #7.  

Page thirteen  above looks like a strong Kirby action layout, with its plethora of leaping and hyper-extended figures throughout the area. The slugfests in panels five through seven are especially enjoyable. There is a strong compositional connection between Bucky’s uppercut in panel five and Cap’s shield slam in panel six, creating the circular movement that takes us around the two separate groups of figures. The tie up of feet at the border of the two panels brings the eye to the pile-up in panel seven.

Jack Kirby from 1941’s Captain America #7.  

Page thirteen  above looks like a strong Kirby action layout, with its plethora of leaping and hyper-extended figures throughout the area. The slugfests in panels five through seven are especially enjoyable. There is a strong compositional connection between Bucky’s uppercut in panel five and Cap’s shield slam in panel six, creating the circular movement that takes us around the two separate groups of figures. The tie up of feet at the border of the two panels brings the eye to the pile-up in panel seven.

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Stuntman splashes pencilled and inked by Jack Kirby, c/o the Kirby Museum.  It’s always interesting with Kirby that as much as his surface style changed over the course of his career, how early he had that facility with big splash-y images— those razzle-dazzle bits like something out of a Broadway musical set piece, those are there pretty darn early with him (and of course, in every possible genre, though it’s understandable to focus on his sci-fi out-there stuff because holy cow)… The Panda wasn’t really his best day, though…

Filed under Worst Hobby or Worstest Hobby? drawrings

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There has always been a silent agreement between Grant Morrison comics and Grant Morrison readers that one thing will not be considered in evaluating these grand struggles for the evolution of the superhero concept: that we won’t just elect to go do something else. That we won’t decide that the best way to deal with the problems of superheroes is to stop reading superhero comics. And this I’ve come to see as a narrative fault, because Morrison keeps going on and on and on about evolution, and yet the superhero decades have proven circular in their advancements, so that Nu 52 DC reads quite a bit like Wildstorm circa 1995, and as a result I find myself standing outside, wondering “hey, if nothing really changes, this guy can just position himself, profitably, as a shaman in perpetuity, right?”

THIS WEEK IN COMICS! (8/27/14 – 52 is an Artificial Limit, and other obvious statements) | The Comics Journal. Jog in full beast mode, taking a look at Multiversity #1. In the comments, the book is revealed as what we expected all along: a desperate attempt at David Brothers fanfic.

(via iamdavidbrothers)

Joe said it all better but:  That was a striking book, just in how unhip it felt compared to everything else I got that week.  It had some interesting ideas in the execution (I like the bit about books being windows into the places the characters will visit, I guess).  There were things to like about it, some.  It just felt like … not of this year.  When Joe talks about looking at it with nostalgia, I think he really nails at least my experience of it— “this might’ve really meant something to me once" was the most it inspired in me (plus a brief "oh no is this going to be about the internet?" fear that Jeff Lester talks about elsewhere)(I don’t know if “no, it’s just going to be about comics again" was too much relief).  Just in the stuff it was concerned about… like, those battles already all got lost.  Bad guys win.  Or good guys win if you’re really into Lady Thor or whatever.  I don’t know.  I don’t care anymore.  I guess that was the weird thing about it— just this visit to a planet of concerns I don’t have anymore…

(Or just this massive body of work he’s been building about superheros being held hostage and corrupted by Decrepit Forces feels very strange right now, when… I’m the first person to be cynical and say “all these indie success stories are a fad and a bubble!  nothing good will last!  humbug!  Humbug to everything!"  But that felt strange right now where the rest of comics are suffused with a very different kind of optimism.  It felt like a book wanting to joust obstacles on a dirt path located adjacent to a … well not a highway, but a different dirt path whose obstacles are probably just being hushed up and also a dirt path with too many science fiction comics on it, what’s with all the science fiction, buy a different set of dice, you nerds, etc.  I don’t know.  I’m babbling about dirt on the internet again, aren’t I?  The behavioral therapy isn’t working…)

Probably this all just says more about me and where I’m at, than anything.  It was just weird how much that seemed like a thing of the early 00’s.  And also just kind of striking given how much you see Morrison’s fingerprints in many of your hip books of the moment.  I read that book after reading not less than three Image books with Morrison’s DNA splattered all over them…

(The Eleanor Davis diaries at the Journal right now are also worth a look).

(via iamdavidbrothers)

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snubpollard:

Penis enlargement ad from the inside-back cover of ero comics magazine Action Pizazz, which — to my dismay — turned out *not* to consist exclusively of porn parodies of serials running in its mainstream-y sister title Manga Action (some of which are pretty borderline to begin with).
Obviously the guys toward the bottom going yesss bigger dicks are the highlight, but I admire the wizened, trustworthy demeanor of Dr. Lauren Davidson; back when birth-of-a-baby movies toured the United States in the 1940s, the producers would always have a “Dr. Elliott Forbes” on location to hawk sexual hygiene booklets at intermission… and, if the film were playing multiple towns on the same day, there’d be a different Dr. Forbes at each one. I guess what I’m saying is, I’d make a terrific Dr. Lauren Davidson. I dress well, I can speak with an authoritative cadence, I’m ‘friendly’ yet emotionally inaccessible - my email is public, Japanese penis pill impresarios!

Action Pizazz.

snubpollard:

Penis enlargement ad from the inside-back cover of ero comics magazine Action Pizazz, which — to my dismay — turned out *not* to consist exclusively of porn parodies of serials running in its mainstream-y sister title Manga Action (some of which are pretty borderline to begin with).

Obviously the guys toward the bottom going yesss bigger dicks are the highlight, but I admire the wizened, trustworthy demeanor of Dr. Lauren Davidson; back when birth-of-a-baby movies toured the United States in the 1940s, the producers would always have a “Dr. Elliott Forbes” on location to hawk sexual hygiene booklets at intermission… and, if the film were playing multiple towns on the same day, there’d be a different Dr. Forbes at each one. I guess what I’m saying is, I’d make a terrific Dr. Lauren Davidson. I dress well, I can speak with an authoritative cadence, I’m ‘friendly’ yet emotionally inaccessible - my email is public, Japanese penis pill impresarios!

Action Pizazz.

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tgarbo-translates:

"Godendeemster" (Götterdämmerung), a Sjef van Oekel story drawn by Theo van den Boogaard and scripted by Wim T. Schippers, translated by Google software and rendered into comprehensibility, though probably not accuracy, by me.

(You’re going to want to open each image individually into a new tab, especially that doozy of a two-page spread. Not safe for work or church, although it helps if you have some Biblical background.)

The Sjef van Oekel stories can be roughly described as R. Crumb meets Hergé; the titular figure was a popular sketch-comedy character on Dutch television and records before Schippers and van den Boogaard began sending him through meticulously-drawn stories that mocked every conceivable form of pretense, hypocrisy, social standard, and ordinary sense. “Godendeemster” is transgressive even by their standards, and the series ended when the comedian who played Sjef filed a lawsuit that included the sexual, scatological, and morbid elements of the comic. But while it lasted it was perhaps the greatest sketch-comedy strip ever created, blackout gags alternating with cruel social satire and dumb puns, all delivered in such a technically polished form that the humor bites all the harder for being delivered in such dispassionately detailed drawings.

Apparently at least some of the Sjef van Oekel strips have already been published in English in Holland under the name “Mr. Ponsford,” possibly including this one. I wonder how I did by comparison.

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